WHEN YOU READ IN THE BERLIN-TUMBLR THAT A DOENER IN ZUERICH COSTS 8 EURO

whenyouliveincologne:

image

(via germanlanguagerocks)

berlingraphs:

Zehlendorf train station

berlingraphs:

Zehlendorf train station

whatshouldwecallhomer:

coughingkate:

professor: *makes broad, sweeping generalization about the uses of a certain ancient greek particle*
me: not all μεν

Really? Not all μεν?  In this δε and age?

(via gindifferent)

whosaprettypolyglot:

maskedlinguist:

lindentreeisle:

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

LINGUISTIC BITCHSLAP.

Thank you. I was too lazy to find my post.

Fun related fact - the meaning of the word “November” in several Slavic languages (and “October” in Croatian because fuck you that’s why) - variations on listopad - is also named for falling leaves, list being “leaf” and pad being “fall”.

whosaprettypolyglot:

maskedlinguist:

lindentreeisle:

acepalindrome:

robotwithhumanhairpt50:

notmysecret:

i…

Fuck

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

LINGUISTIC BITCHSLAP.

Thank you. I was too lazy to find my post.

Fun related fact - the meaning of the word “November” in several Slavic languages (and “October” in Croatian because fuck you that’s why) - variations on listopad - is also named for falling leaves, list being “leaf” and pad being “fall”.

(via queenglossophile)

germannn:

lavidapoliglota:

a guide to using cases in German, as requested by insertarnombreaqui

I tried to make it as nonthreatening as possible - click the tiles to view them properly, or loathe me if you’re on the mobile app

formation of cases coming tomorrow!

Heads up, there are a few mistakes in here.

  • On the dative slide it should be “das Buch”.
  • One example on the genitive slide is wrong. It has to be “Wegen des Verkehrs bin ich spät.”
  • The statement “the accusative is always used after the prepositions: trotz, wegen, während, an Stelle, innerhalb, außerhalb” is also incorrect. I’m sure it was just an accident and not due to a lack of understanding (since it’s on the correct slide), but “accusative” needs to be replaced with “genitive” here. (Side note: The genitive case is often replaced by the dative case in spoken language.)

(via queenglossophile)

lifesaviour:

Schlussmacher Outtakes.

I just saw this movie the other day. Give it a chance if you’ve got Netflix’s streaming service! Absolutely hilarious.

(via germanlanguagerocks)

linguisten:

"Language change"
The semantics and pragmatics of parent-child communication
(to be continued)

linguisten:

"Language change"

The semantics and pragmatics of parent-child communication

(to be continued)

(via fuckyeahmylanguage)

missalsfromiram:

Yola Zong (An Old Song), sung in Yola, an extinct dialect or language descended from Middle English which was spoken in the Forth and Bargy baronies of Wexford, Ireland, until the 19th century.

Pretty cool video. See how much of it you can understand :)

(via speutschlish)

lomomiket:

Berlin 07/2014
Lomo LC-A+Perutz100, xpro, double

lomomiket:

Berlin 07/2014

Lomo LC-A+Perutz100, xpro, double

(via boyinberlin)

A blog about traveling, languages, linguistics, and cultures. I just got back from my study abroad trip to Germany, and greatly enjoyed Europe.

When not traveling, I study Languages and Cultures at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. I hope you enjoy!

Currently in: U.S.A.

Currently Learning: German (Deutsch)

view archive



My Photo Album

Videos

What I Look Like

Text Updates

Questions

Submissions